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Updating table with table variable

For instance, consider the following example: DECLARE @tbl TABLE ( ordinal int NOT NULL, word varchar(100) NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED (ordinal) ); INSERT INTO @tbl (ordinal, word) VALUES (1, 'This'), (2, 'is'), (3, 'a'), (4, 'test'), (5, 'of'), (6, 'string'), (7, 'concatenation'); DECLARE @output varchar(1000)=''; On a side-note: We looked at a more advanced string concatenation example, using XML, in a previous post.

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There are restrictions on when this caching can occur however that are possible to violate for function does not work and the internal name is entirely system generated with no relationship to the variable name.If stored procedure A creates a temporary table and calls stored procedure B, then B will be able to use the temporary table that A created.It's generally considered good coding practice to explicitly drop every temporary table you create.This means that the SET clause of the UPDATE statement is evaluated once for every row in the updated table.With the SELECT statement, you can’t assign variables and return an output in the same statement. Reset(); // Iterate through rows while not Project.

Is EOF() do begin // Retrieve a value value := Project.

----------- ----------- ------ ------------------- ------------- ------------ ------------ ----------------------- | object_id | name | rows | type_desc | total_pages | used_pages | data_pages | data_compression_desc | ----------- ----------- ------ ------------------- ------------- ------------ ------------ ----------------------- | 574625090 | #22401542 | 13 | IN_ROW_DATA | 2 | 2 | 1 | PAGE | | 574625090 | #22401542 | 13 | LOB_DATA | 24 | 19 | 0 | PAGE | | 574625090 | #22401542 | 13 | ROW_OVERFLOW_DATA | 16 | 14 | 0 | PAGE | | 574625090 | #22401542 | 13 | IN_ROW_DATA | 2 | 2 | 1 | NONE | ----------- ----------- ------ ------------------- ------------- ------------ ------------ ----------------------- DECLARE @T TABLE(X INT) CREATE TABLE #T(X INT) BEGIN TRAN INSERT #T OUTPUT INSERTED.

X INTO @T VALUES(1),(2),(3) /*Both have 3 rows*/ SELECT * FROM #T SELECT * FROM @T ROLLBACK /*Only table variable now has rows*/ SELECT * FROM #T SELECT * FROM @T DROP TABLE #T transaction log.

The below demonstrates the metadata is still there however by keying in on a (hopefully unique) column name.

For tables without unique column names the object_id can be determined using 0), B INT DEFAULT 1, In Row Filler char(1000) DEFAULT REPLICATE('A',1000), Off Row Filler varchar(8000) DEFAULT REPLICATE('B',8000), LOBFiller varchar(max) DEFAULT REPLICATE(cast('C' as varchar(max)),10000), UNIQUE CLUSTERED (A, B) WITH (FILLFACTOR = 80, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = ON, DATA_COMPRESSION = PAGE, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS=ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS=ON) ) INSERT INTO @T (A) VALUES (1),(1),(2),(3),(4),(5),(6),(7),(8),(9),(10),(11),(12),(13) SELECT t.object_id, t.name, p.rows, a.type_desc, a.total_pages, a.used_pages, a.data_pages, p.data_compression_desc FROM partitions AS p INNER JOIN system_internals_allocation_units AS a ON p.hobt_id = a.container_id INNER JOIN tables AS t ON t.object_id = p.object_id INNER JOIN columns AS c ON c.object_id = p.object_id WHERE = 'dba.se' Duplicate key was ignored.

After the UPDATE, we can view the value of the @counter variable to see how many rows we actually modified.